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at kiev business school and from washington, mihala acting director of the council's energy and environment program. jacob, is there much in the way of economic leverage at the u.s. holds in russia? >> cared to the e.u. in my opinion no. you like in europe, for instance, you could move to targeted freezes because a lot of russian least similar to what the former ukraine cocaine leadership had in europe, they had money inside the e.u. and that could be frozen. they don't have as far as i know much money in the u.s. so no, there isn't much. >> how is russia enmeshed in the economy of e.u. and europe more broadly? >> indeed, but the point is that the current situation isn't purely economic. when speaking just about the economy, western countries, european countries are interested in keeping close ties to russia in importing russian gas and exporting technology and investing into huge russian potential. but at the moment since last week we have geopolitical military situation and it prevails on economic. that is why european leaders change their minds and their statement become
for the world? >> i think the report they released today is excellent. a lot of time and energy goes into it. i think the trends are right. in a number of countries you have growing activism. and they are taking to the streets or the blogs or trying to communicate through the press. and governments are cracking down. so i think the attack on civil society, is one of the trends that they rightly highlighted in the state department report. >> did you see areas that they either missed or you disagreed with their interpretation on? >> which is something they led when he was assistant secretary. therefore, however, some gaps. housing rights is not included and very recently, hundreds of egyptians has been kicked out, and this pattern happens in many countries around the world. another example is the broader issue of how this report informs u.s. foreign policy. once it has criticized them in the report. >> catlin in many places it's become dangerous, complicated to be a reporter. was 23 a bad year? >> i think it follows on the trends we have seen. the freedom has seen decline in the level of global a
think the report they released today is excellent. lots of time and energy goes into it. i think the trends are right. what i would highlight is that in a number of countries you have a growing activism especially by young people. and they're taking to the streets or taking to the blogs or trying to get their communique to the press, and governments are cracking down on them. i think the attack on civil society, on the press, on the media is one of the trends that they rightly highlighted in the state department report. >> sasanjev, did you see areas that they missed or you disagreed with their interpretation? >> the report over all is very robust and has a lot of important information in it. the state department is applauded to be including internet freedom which i, theree gaps. housing rights is not included, and very recently in cairo, hundreds of egyptians had been kicked out of their homes by the government. this sort of pattern happens in many countries around the world. another example is the broader issue of how this report informs u.s. foreign policy. does the u.s. gover
with russia's politically motivated trade practices, whether it's manipulating the energy supply or banning the -- in ukraine. the fact is this is the 21st century, and we should not see nations step backwards to behave in 19th or 20th century fashion. there are ways to resolve these distances. great nations choose to do that appropriately. the fact is that we believe that there are a set of options available to russia and to all of us that could move us down a road for appropriate diplomacy and appropriate diplomatic engagement. and we invite russia to come to that table and particularly, we invite russia directly with the government of ukraine to work through these issues in a thoughtful way. i'm very proud to be here in ukraine. like so many americans and other people around the world, we have watched with extraordinary awe the power of individuals, unarmed, except with ideas, principles and values, who have reached for freedom, for equality, for opportunity. there's nothing more important in this world. that is what drives change in so many parts of the world today. it's really partly w
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4